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Education Attainment Division

The case for internships

Ben Goldstein on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 12:30:00 pm 

When it comes to landing that first job after college, research shows that completing an internship makes a world of difference in the eyes of hiring managers. Aside from providing students with work-based learning experiences, internships are used by communities to build talent pipelines that funnel students into the workforce.

The Fellowship for Education Attainment challenges chamber professionals to develop regional action plans that address specific education needs in their communities. Below, descriptions of plans devised by two former Fellows offer case studies on how to set up a successful internship program in your community.

Pathways to Pipelines

In the Chicago area, most employers judge internship experience as more valuable than other academic credentials, says Anne Kisting, executive director at the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce Foundation.

In addition to helping students find jobs, Kisting figured internships could also solve a chronic problem facing regional employers—a severe shortage of IT talent. This led the chamber, in partnership with its local school district, to expand the Pathways to Pipelines initiative, which connects high school STEM students with small businesses from the community.

“We’re giving these students meaningful, work-based learning experiences that make them more attractive for employment,” says Kisting. “Some of these students come from schools in disadvantaged neighborhoods, so these kinds of internships are a way to level the playing field.”

The chamber educates businesses owners about best practices in internships, including the need for soft skills training. To ensure success, the chamber hosted an education session for business owners on the topic of managing internships.

“It sounds intuitive, but it’s not,” says Kisting. “We equip small business owners with tips and advice to make this an optimal experience all-around. Being aware of the need for soft skills and being willing to work on them is essential.”

Kisting plans to work with local colleges to create a more direct school-to-employer pipeline and engage larger businesses by expanding the Pathways program. She also wants to see employers gain more perspective on internships and the myriad benefits they offer.

“I envision this expanding into the college internship space, so that a meaningful IT talent pipeline is created for employers in the Chicagoland region,” she says, adding: “I also hope that employers will be more educated about the return on investment in internships.”

Career Sync

In Springfield, Ohio, a city of 59,000 wedged partway between Columbus and Dayton, Amy Donahoe, director of workforce development at the Chamber of Greater Springfield, sought a way to use her regional action plan as a springboard to retain a larger share of the intern talent, much of which leaves the city after college and never returns.

“The main goal of Career Sync is to take the young talent while they’re working here for the summer and engage them in more aspects of the community,” said Donahoe. "We want to engage them with people and events and show them what we’re all about and the type of people that are here.”

Donahoe engaged local young professional groups to help brainstorm ways to enhance the internship experience in the city, efforts which culminated in a series of four educational and networking sessions, in which YPs would teach interns about topics like networking and personal branding, community attractions, negotiating compensation packages and investing and retirement savings.

Through Career Sync, the chamber was able to link up prominent employers with well-established internship programs like Speedway LLC, the gas station and convenience store chain headquartered in Clark County, with other, smaller businesses that are considering setting up their own internship programs. Career Sync also assigned young professionals as mentors to the interns to guide them and help them grow professionally.

Donahoe intends to grow Career Sync and establish a fundraising plan to raise money for the program, which had relied on volunteer time and donations for the educational sessions. She hopes to organize a larger event, like a sports game, to engage more interns and young professionals.

“I want to really engage a larger group of interns, so incorporating a big event is something we can do,” said Donahoe. “Based on the feedback I got from employers, it seems like they all think this is something that can grow bigger and have more of an impact in the future.”

Tags: Education Attainment Division, Fellowship for Education Attainment, Internships

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Chamber leaders accepted to Fellowship

Ben Wills on Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 1:39:00 pm 

Leaders from 21 chambers of commerce, representing communities throughout the United States, have been selected to participate in ACCE’s Fellowship for Education Attainment.

The Fellowship is an immersive executive development program that provides chamber of commerce professionals with education and tools to improve the birth-to-career education pipeline in the communities they serve.

Throughout the year-long experience, Fellows work to develop a regional action plan that focuses on addressing specific education attainment or workforce development issues in their communities.

Congratulations to this year’s Fellows!

Kristi Barr
Director, Workforce Development & Education
Little Rock Regional Chamber
Little Rock, Arkansas

Travis Burton
Manager of Public Affairs
Kentucky Chamber of Commerce
Frankfort, Kentucky

Cathy Burwell, IOM
President & CEO
Helena Area Chamber of Commerce
Helena, Montana

Tim Cairl
Director, Education Policy
Metro Atlanta Chamber
Atlanta, Georgia

Brett Campbell
Senior Vice President for Education and Workforce
Tulsa Regional Chamber of Commerce
Tulsa, Oklahoma

Christopher Cooney, IOM, CCE
President & CEO
Metro South Chamber of Commerce
Brockton, Massachusetts

Jonathan Davis
Director of Workforce Initiatives
Augusta Metro Chamber of Commerce
Augusta, Georgia

Melanie D’Evelyn
Manager, Education Attainment
Detroit Regional Chamber Foundation
Detroit, Michigan

Dexter Freeman, II
Director of Intelligence, Innovation, & Education
Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce
Irving, Texas

Christy Gillenwater, IOM, CCE
President & CEO
Southwest Indiana Chamber
Evansville, Indiana

Derek Kirk
Director of Community & Government Relations
North Orange County Chamber
Fullerton, California

Angelle Laborde, CCE
President & CEO
Greenwood Area Chamber of Commerce
Greenwood, South Carolina

Meaghan Lewis
Government Affairs Manager
North Carolina Chamber
Raleigh, North Carolina

Amber Mooney
Manager, Government Affairs
The Business Council of New York State
Albany, New York

Dr. Gilda Ramirez
Vice President, Small Business & Education
United Corpus Christi Chamber of Commerce
Corpus Christi, Texas

Chris Romer, IOM
President & CEO
Vail Valley Partnership
Avon, Colorado

JoAnn Sasse Givens
Director of Workforce Development
Effingham County Chamber of Commerce
Effingham, Illinois

Mary Anne Sheahan
Executive Director of Leadership & Workforce Development
Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce
Burlington, Vermont

Barbara Stapleton
Vice President of Workforce & Education
GO Topeka
Topeka, Kansas

Sherry Taylor
President & CEO
Mason Deerfield Chamber
Mason, Ohio

Emily Ward
Vice President, Foundation Supports & Grant Management
Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce
Brooklyn, New York

Find more information about ACCE’s Fellowship for Education Attainment here, or contact Molly Blankenship, community advancement coordinator, by email or phone at 703-998-3530. ACCE will begin accepting applications for the next Fellowship cohort in May, 2018.

Tags: ACCE News, Education Attainment, Education Attainment Division, Fellowship for Education Attainment

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